Teenage drivers often lack the judgment and driving experience that others on the road share. So, when more teenage drivers hit the roads, the number of crashes involving them, and your risk of involvement in a crash with them, rise sharply. Statistics show that the period of time between Memorial Day and Labor Day is a particularly risky time for you to be on the road, and so much so that it has become known as summer’s 100 Deadliest Days. 

Per AAA, more than seven people have died daily during the 100 Deadliest Days span every year between 2008 and 2018, with more than 8,300 individuals losing their lives in teen-involved crashes during this time. 

100 Deadliest Days statistics 

New teen drivers who are 16 and 17 years of age face heightened crash risks the more they drive. Research shows that for every mile 16- and 17-year-old drivers cover, they increase their chances of a deadly crash three times over. Also troubling is the fact that 72% of teen drivers between 16 and 18 admit to engaging in dangerous behaviors within the past 30 days that compound crash risks even further. 

Deadly and dangerous teen driving behaviors 

What dangerous risks are teen drivers taking nowadays that endanger you and everyone else on the roads? Speeding is a major problem among this driving population. While 40% of teens admit to driving more than 15 mph over the speed limit on highways, another 47% of them admit to traveling more than 10 mph over the limit on residential roads. 

Texting behind the wheel, too, continues to be common and problematic among young drivers, with 35% of them acknowledging having done so within the past month. Another 32% of teen motorists admit to running red lights, while another 31% admit to driving aggressively. Drowsy driving, which studies suggest may be more dangerous than drunk driving, is also a frequent issue, with a quarter of teen drivers admitting to doing so within the past 30 days.